Archive for the ‘Rock Climbing’ Category

Rock Climbing – Prussik and Rappel Class

Sunday, May 10th, 2015

My Awesome BRS Group
From L-R: Elizabeth, Peter, Clare & Jill (Instructors), Becky, and Seth

After their exciting multi-pitch day, climbing the First Flatironette, it was time to learn how to use prussiks to ascend/descend a rope, how to rappel, and how to pass a knot. These basic self rescue skills are essential for rock climbers to know and could mean the difference between life and death.

Unfortunately, for the students, they got some adversity training on top of their normal curriculum! With a few inches of fresh spring powder, we were guaranteed a chilly start to our day!


Rock Climbing – First Flatironette

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015

Basic Rock School Multi-pitch Group Shot
From L-R: Andy (Assistant Instructor), Seth, Climbergirl (Senior Instructor), Peter, Becky, and Elizabeth

On Sunday, Andy and I took our Basic Rock Climbing Students up their first multi-pitch climb, the east face of the First Flatironette. It is a very mellow climb consisting of two pitches, with a huge tree-ledge in the middle. Students had passed their knot tying and belay exams earlier that morning, so this was trial by climbing!

We started climbing around noon and finished 2 hours later. Everybody got a chance to belay and coil the ropes at the end. It sprinkled on us a little bit as we were topping out, so it was a good lesson in getting an early start. After climbing, we went to a brewpub and celebrated our success!

Rock Climbing – Seal Rock East Face (5.4), Boulder, CO

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

Flatirons in Spring

Great Day on Seal Rock!
Seal Rock is Fun!

Relieved to Be Touching Down
The Sea of Joy Rappel is a thrill!

On a fine spring day, Jane and I decide to have an adventure and climb Seal Rock. The East Face is a classic climb and goes at 5.4. It has a 45 minute approach hike, which is sure to warm up the circulation as there is ~800 ft of gain from the parking lot. The climb is typical flatiron sandstone with some sections of run out. Bring lots of slings (I had 17 shoulder sized slings and 2 double lengths) to reduce rope drag. Also, I suggest doubles of #1 and #2 sized BD cams, for anchors. I brought a #3 and a #4, but I’d say the #4 is optional.

Start Hiking: 6:50am
Start Climbing: 7:50am
Finish Climbing: 12:20pm
Done with Rappel: 1:20pm
Finish Hiking: 2:50pm


Rock Climbing, Self Rescue Class

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

Self Rescue Practice Day in the Rain/Snow
Instructors ready to begin self rescue session. I’m the one in the green poncho!

RMR Instruction
I’m in the red parka, “rescuing” Andy.

Andy Rescuing Clare
Here’s Andy, “rescuing” me!

On Saturday, I attended a rock climbing self rescue class, hosted by members of the Rocky Mountain Rescue. A major benefit to teaching Basic Rock Climbing School with the Colorado Mountain Club is being able to attend this whole day practice session. Prior to teaching Basic Rock Climbing, I would have to pay a guide to take me out and review these skills. Now, I get to review the skills in the setting of other rock climbing instructors without having to pay a ton of money.

Thanks to the RMR rescue guys who volunteered their time to hold this session! Every year, I retain more and more of the techniques!

Mountaineering – Dallas Peak (13,809 ft)

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

Blue Lake and Mt. Sneffels Panorama from Dallas Peak
Blue Lake and Mt. Sneffels Panorama From North Side of Dallas Peak

Fortunately, it did not rain over the course of the night. Maybe we would have dry 5th class climbing!

Dallas Peak Topo Map With Waypoints
Our Route with Waypoints

At 4am, Uwe made the rounds, making sure everybody was awake. In complete darkness, I emerged from the tent. Everybody was ready and excited. Would this be our lucky day?